Alcoholism Phoenix

The uniqueness of alcoholism compared to other addictions is that it is so widespread and is truly inclusive to men and women and those who have not quite decided on their gender. It affects every race, every religion, children, teenagers, adults, thin or fat, tall or short, able-bodied and people with disabilities. There is most likely a genetic element in that if you come from a family of heavy drinkers you are at a greater risk than a family that practices abstinence.

Alcohol is ingrained in much of the world’s cultures. Think of French, Spanish or Italian wines, Japanese Sake and of course no article on alcohol is complete without a mention of Irish Whiskey. German beers, Russian vodka, and Mexican Tequila in addition to the array of craft beers sprouting up across the USA further demonstrate the many ways alcohol surrounds every aspect of life.

The brewing of the first alcoholic beverages can be traced back several thousand years, but the treatment of alcoholism in the USA began in the 1750s with Native American tribes forming “Sobriety Circles.” For women, the creation of the Martha Washington Home in Chicago in 1867 was the first place that focused on “inebriate women.” Alcoholics Anonymous was formed in 1935 and has helped millions of people turn away from alcohol. In 1956, alcoholism was declared a disease by the American Medical Association (AMA), and treatment was finally on the right path.

ARC and Naltrexone

The stated mission at Addiction Recovery Centers (ARC) located in Phoenix, Arizona is to “provide every patient with a committed, comfortable, compassionate, individualized, and science-based treatment for their disease.” ARC realizes that those engaged in alcoholism in Phoenix are not people who find themselves sleeping in the gutter each night in ragged, dirty clothing begging for their next drink.

Most alcoholics are functional people living ordinary lives but who are losing the battle as the need to drink becomes a priority instead of just a pleasure.

ARC is a proponent of The Sinclair Method (TSM) that uses a drug called Naltrexone to combat the addiction. Naltrexone was first synthesized in 1963 by Endo Laboratories later acquired by DuPont in 1969. The FDA approved it in 1984 for the treatment of addiction to opioids like heroin and oxycodone, but it was not until 1994 that the FDA approved it for alcohol use disorders.

TSM allows the patient to drink alcohol, but Naltrexone takes away the urges and the good feelings associated with it. With regular counseling, the average result is a gradual reduction of alcohol intake. The Naltrexone is administered with a pill taken every 24 hours, an injection taken once every 28 days or as an implanted pellet that will last six to 10 months.

ARC realizes that opioid addiction is a growing problem in the USA and offers treatment programs for prescribed opiates like Codeine, Fentanyl and illegal street drugs like Heroin in addition to their programs for alcoholism in Phoenix.

If you or a family member has an addiction and needs help then ARC in Phoenix, Arizona is there to help you. For more information, you can call 24/7 to the toll-free number 1-855-393-4673 or send an email to hope@addictionrecoverycenters.com. The convenient online form is also a great way to send a detailed message to ARC about your situation.

1-855-910-5918